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Environmental groups have welcomed a decision by Britain’s Conservative government to lift its opposition to onshore wind farms. But they warn that any benefit will be erased if the government backs plans to open the U.K.’s first new coal mine in three decades. The Conservative government has opposed new wind turbines on land since 2015 because of local opposition. A majority of Britain’s wind farms are at sea. But the government said Tuesday it would allow wind farms in areas where communities support them. Thursday is the deadline for a decision on the proposed coal mine in northwest England. Opponents say approval would ruin the U.K.’s image as a leader in replacing polluting fossil fuels.

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World shares have fallen, with Hong Kong’s benchmark down more than 3%, even as Beijing announced it was drastically scaling back its “zero-COVID” policies. Oil prices also dropped. The declines followed a retreat on Wall Street, driven by fears the Federal Reserve will need to keep the brakes on the U.S. economy to get inflation under control, risking a sharp recession. China reported its imports and exports fell in November as global demand weakened and anti-virus controls weighed on the second-largest economy. The S&P 500 fell 1.4% Tuesday, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq shed 2% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 1%.

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Tesla has launched sales in Thailand, offering its popular Model 3 and Model Y at prices aimed at competing with rivals like China's BYD. The company staged a glitzy showcase of its plans Wednesday at Bangkok's Siam Paragon mall. Online purchases have begun, with plans to deliver vehicles to buyers in the first quarter of next year. Southeast Asia's market of more than 600 million consumers is increasingly a focus for automakers looking to expand sales, especially of electric vehicles. Still, Thailand remains mainly a land of gasoline, diesel and LPG-fueled vehicles, even as a nationwide network of charging stations expands.

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The Food and Drug Administration is slowing its use of a pathway that expedites the approval of promising drugs. The downturn comes as the agency's accelerated approval program comes under new scrutiny from Congress, government watchdogs and key agency leaders. Increasingly, the FDA is asking drugmakers to remove unproven uses from older drugs that haven't delivered on early results. And drugmakers seeking accelerated approval for new medicines are facing tougher hurdles at the agency. Legislation pending in Congress would codify those standards. Many experts support the measures as a way to claw back unproven drug uses after a recent boom in accelerated approvals.

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Shares are lower in Asia after benchmarks fell again on Wall Street on fears the Federal Reserve will need to keep the brakes on the economy to get inflation under control, risking a sharp recession. Oil prices were mixed. China reported its imports and exports fell in November as global demand weakened and anti-virus controls weighed on the second-largest economy. The S&P 500 fell 1.4% Tuesday, its fourth straight loss. The tech-heavy Nasdaq gave back even more, 2%, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 1%. The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which helps set mortgage rate, fell to 3.52%.

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Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has delivered another rebuke of Donald Trump, saying anyone who thinks the Constitution can be suspended would have a “very hard time” becoming president in the United States. The comment marked the second time in as many weeks that McConnell and other Republicans have been compelled to denounce Trump’s words and actions since the former president announced he is running again for the White House in 2024. Over the weekend, Trump called for the “the termination of all rules, regulations, and articles, even those found in the Constitution” after new revelations of what he said was Twitter’s unfair treatment of him during the 2020 presidential election,

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Donald Trump’s company has been convicted of tax fraud for a scheme by top executives to avoid paying personal income taxes on perks such as apartments and luxury cars. As punishment, the Trump Organization could be fined up to $1.6 million. The guilty verdict Tuesday day came on the second day of deliberations in the only criminal trial to arise from the Manhattan district attorney’s three-year investigation of the former president and his businesses. Longtime Trump Organization finance chief Allen Weisselberg previously pleaded guilty to hatching the 15-year scheme. He testified at the trial in exchange for a promised five-month jail sentence. Trump himself was not on trial.

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A federal judge ordered a Wisconsin company that cleans hundreds of slaughterhouses nationwide to ensure it is complying with child labor laws after investigators identified at least 50 minors scrubbing and sanitizing dangerous equipment at five different meatpacking plants in Nebraska, Minnesota and Arkansas. Packers Sanitation Services Inc. also entered into an agreement with the Labor Department that was announced Tuesday. As part of that, the company promised to hire an outside consultant to review its hiring policies and provide additional training for its managers. Investigators are still in the early stages of reviewing thousands of pages of records from other plants. The company employs some 17,000 people working at more than 700 locations nationwide.

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A federal judge ordered a Wisconsin company that cleans hundreds of slaughterhouses nationwide to ensure it is complying with child labor laws after investigators identified at least 50 minors scrubbing and sanitizing dangerous equipment at five different meatpacking plants in Nebraska, Minnesota and Arkansas. Packers Sanitation Services Inc. also entered into an agreement with the Labor Department that was announced Tuesday. As part of that, the company promised to hire an outside consultant to review its hiring policies and provide additional training for its managers. Investigators are still in the early stages of reviewing thousands of pages of records from other plants. The company employs some 17,000 people working at more than 700 locations nationwide.

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Argentina's Vice President Cristina Fernández has been found guilty of committing a $1 billion fraud involving public works contracts during her presidency. A panel of judges announced her conviction and sentenced her Tuesday to six years in prison and a lifetime ban from public office. The populist leader is certain to appeal. Having denied all the allegations, Fernández lashed out at the verdict, describing herself as the victim of a “judicial mafia.” But she also later announced that she will not run next year for the presidency, a post she previously held in 2007-2015. Her supporters vowed to paralyze the country in a nationwide strike. She will remain immune from arrest until her appeal is settled.

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A New York jury has convicted Donald Trump’s company of tax fraud. Tuesday's verdict could damage the Republican politically and adds to an already long list of legal headaches as he mounts another run for president. Although Trump was not personally charged in the Manhattan district attorney’s tax case against the Trump Organization, he faces other inquiries. They include a criminal investigation over top secret documents found at his Florida estate, probes in Georgia and Washington into his efforts to undo the results of the 2020 presidential election and more probes in New York. Trump has denied any wrongdoing.

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The former CEO of a Mississippi grain storage and processing company has been indicted on federal and state charges more than a year after the company filed for bankruptcy. John R. Coleman of Greenwood, Mississippi, was the head of Express Grain Terminals. U.S. Attorney Clay Joyner and Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch announced the indictments of 46-year-old Coleman on Tuesday. A federal grand jury indicted Coleman on charges of defrauding farmers, banks and the Mississippi Department of Agriculture. Coleman made his initial appearance Tuesday in federal court in Greenville. Federal court records did not list an attorney for Coleman.

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President Joe Biden has visited the building site for an Arizona computer chip plant to emphasize how his policies are fostering job growth in what could be a challenge to the incoming Republican House majority. The Democratic president has staked his legacy in large part on major investments in technology and infrastructure that were approved by Congress along bipartisan lines. Biden maintains the factory jobs fostered by $52 billion in semiconductor investments and another $200 billion for scientific research will help revive the U.S. middle class. Republican House Leader Kevin McCarthy has attacked the government investments as a “blank check” and “corporate welfare.”

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A Japanese company says it plans to build batteries for electric BMW vehicles at a new plant in South Carolina, spending $810 million on a facility that could have up to 1,170 workers. Envision AESC did not say Tuesday when its plant in Florence will open, but BMW said in its own announcement at its South Carolina plant in October that it wants to have electric vehicles amount to half its total auto production by 2030. The German automaker announced it would use Envision AESC to make batteries, but the exact location of the plant wasn’t released until Tuesday.

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A panel is calling for changes at the federal agency that oversees most of the nation's food supply, saying revamped leadership, a clear mission and more urgency are needed to prevent illness outbreaks and to promote good health. But the report released Tuesday stopped short of recommending specific steps to take, instead offering several scenarios. The Reagan-Udall Foundation, a group separate from but closely tied to the federal Food and Drug Administration, said in a report that the agency leadership and culture must be restructured to better respond to food safety crises and chronic public health problems.

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A former Theranos executive learns Wednesday whether he will be punished as severely as his former lover and business partner for peddling the company’s bogus blood-testing technology that duped investors and endangered patients. Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani was convicted in July of fraud and conspiracy. He will be sentenced less than three weeks after Elizabeth Holmes, the company’s founder and CEO, received more than 11 years in prison for her role in a scandal that threw a bright light on Silicon Valley’s dark side. Holmes could have gotten up to 20 years in prison — a penalty that U.S. District Judge Edward Davila could now impose on Balwani. He spent six years as Theranos’ chief operating officer.

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A former Miami congressman who signed a $50 million consulting contract with Venezuela’s socialist government was arrested Monday on charges of money laundering and representing a foreign government without registering. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami says Republican David Rivera was arrested in Atlanta. The eight-count indictment alleges he was part of a conspiracy to lobby on behalf of Venezuela to improve U.S.-Venezuela relations, resolve an oil company legal dispute and end U.S. economic sanctions against the South American nation — without registering as a foreign agent. A lawyer for Rivera said he had not seen the indictment and Rivera did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

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A newly founded Japanese semiconductor company aiming to revive Japan’s chip industry has signed an agreement to collaborate with a Belgian research organization in developing next-generation chips for production in Japan. Economy and Industry Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura says the new company, Rapidus, which was launched last month by eight big corporations including automakers, electronics giants and chip manufacturers, is teaming up with Imec, a Belgium-based research organization known for nanoelectronics and digital technologies key to developing next-generation chips. Japan’s government is spending 70 billion yen ($510 million) to encourage domestic chip production while collaborating with the United States.

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A Conservative member of Britain's House of Lords says she is taking a leave of absence from Parliament to “clear her name” over allegations that she profited from links to a company awarded government contracts for personal protective equipment during the coronavirus pandemic. Michelle Mone has denied reports that she used her political connections to recommend a company called PPE Medpro to senior government officials and won contracts worth more than 200 million pounds ($244 million) to supply protective equipment to the government in 2020. The Guardian newspaper has reported that Mone and her children received 29 million pounds originating from profits of PPE Medpro. Mone’s lawyers have said she is not connected to the company in any capacity.

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The unabashedly liberal city of San Francisco became the unlikely proponent of weaponized police robots last week after supervisors approved them for limited use. In doing so, the board addressed head-on an evolving technology that's become more widely available, although rarely deployed to confront suspects. San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott said armed robots would be used only as a last resort. Three members of the city's Board of Supervisors joined dozens of protesters against the policy outside City Hall on Monday. Police departments across the U.S. are facing increasing scrutiny of militarized equipment, amid a yearslong national reckoning on criminal justice.

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Jurors in the Trump Organization’s criminal tax fraud trial will continue deliberating for a second day on Tuesday as they weigh charges that former President Donald Trump’s company helped executives dodge personal income taxes on perks. Jurors deliberated for about four hours on Monday. The deliberations follow a monthlong trial that featured testimony from seven witnesses, including longtime Trump Organization finance chief Allen Weisselberg and Senior Vice President and Controller Jeffrey McConney. An outside accountant who spent years preparing tax returns for Trump and the company also testified.

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The Minnesota Board of Pharmacy is suing a Moorhead-based manufacturer of THC-laced gummies, saying the company’s candies contain far stronger doses of the chemical that gives marijuana its high than state law allows. The lawsuit filed Monday alleges that Northland Vapor and its stores in Moorhead and Bemidji are violating Minnesota’s new law allowing low-potency edible and drinkable cannabinoids. It alleges investigators found candies with 20 times the legal dose and packages containing 50 times the limit. The board says it has embargoed the products, which it says have a retail value of over $7 million

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The Mississippi Department of Human Services is changing its demands against retired NFL quarterback Brett Favre in a lawsuit that seeks repayment of misspent welfare money. The funds were intended to help some of the poorest people in the U.S. The department dropped its demand of $1.1 million against Favre, acknowledging he has already repaid that money for an unfulfilled pledge of public speeches. But it made a new demand of up to $5 million against Favre and a university sports foundation, saying money from an anti-poverty program was improperly used to pay for a volleyball arena at the University of Southern Mississippi.

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