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The author of “Heat” writes of his adventures working in restaurant kitchens in Lyon, France. “So much cooking and eating gets done that Buford’s next book, after ‘Heat’ and ‘Dirt,’ in order to preserve the ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ cadence, should probably be titled ‘Gout,’” wrote New York Times reviewer Dwight Garner. “I admire this book enormously; it’s a profound and intuitive work of immersive journalism.”

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Samantha Power, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “‘A Problem from Hell’: America and the Age of Genocide,” here tells her life’s journey from her Dublin childhood to stints in the Obama administration and United Nations.

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Speaking of Agatha Christie, Weinberg’s acclaimed debut (named one of The New York Times’ 10 best crime novels of 2020), set on a Norfolk, England, college campus, features a murder at its center that “might have met with the approval of the Queen of Crime” herself, wrote NYT reviewer Marilyn Stasio. “Dame Agatha happens to figure tangentially in this uncommonly clever whodunit, which makes plentiful references to her books, plot twists, settings and even the 11 days in 1926 when she inexplicably disappeared — all while coming across as madly original.” (Penguin, $17, out Jan. 26)

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No. 1 New York Times bestselling author Nicholas Sparks returns with the story of an injured Navy doctor. Trevor Benson never intended to move back to New Bern, North Carolina. But when a mortar blast outside the hospital where he worked sent him home from Afghanistan with devastating injuries, the dilapidated cabin he’d inherited from his grandfather seemed as good a place to regroup as any. Trevor isn’t prepared to fall in love with a local ... yet, from their very first encounter, Trevor feels a connection with deputy sheriff Natalie Masterson that he can’t ignore.

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You just might need the warm, chatty delights of a Lipman novel. This one, her 11th, is about an old yearbook that goes astray, causing troubles for its owner’s grown daughter and the busybody documentary filmmaker who finds it. A New York Times reviewer described it as “a caper novel, light as a feather and effortlessly charming” and said it “inspires a very specific kind of modern joy.”

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James’ thick saga — the first in a planned trilogy taking place in a fantasy land inspired by African history and mythology — follows a tracker hired to find a child who has mysteriously vanished. New York Times books critic Michiko Kakutani wrote, “In these pages, James conjures the literary equivalent of a Marvel Comics universe — filled with dizzying, magpie references to old movies and recent TV, ancient myths and classic comic books, and fused into something new and startling by his gifts for language and sheer inventiveness.”

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—Sept. 19, 2019: The Washington Post and The New York Times report that the whistleblower's complaint involves Trump's call with the Ukrainian…

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The McCook Rotary Chapter, McCook Community Foundation Fund, Nebraska Community Foundation and the Aspen Institute helping to bring New York T…

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